Environment

  • Exploring the natural world through the lens of a camera

    Three photographers who've captured slices of life in far off places share a few words about their experiences in the field to inspire us as we prepare to inspire representatives on WWF's Lobby Day.

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  • 2018 was the fourth-hottest year on record

    The US government announced 2018 as the fourth warmest year on recordand a costly one too. Learn what's happening now and what you can do to help a warming climate.

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  • Diving for Data in the Galápagos

    An innovative program’s ultimate goal is to help boost the “ocean economy” in the Galápagos in a sustainable way—ensuring that tourism and livelihoods can flourish while minimizing any impact on its irreplaceable ecosystem.

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  • Monarch butterfly populations are on the rise

    The latest survey of monarch butterfly habitat in Mexico is a testament to the power of conservation. This year’s survey, conducted by WWF-Mexico and partners, found monarchs in 14.94 acres of forest, up from 6.12 acres at the same time last winter.

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  • 2018: A Year in Stunning Conservation Photography

    Photography is a powerful tool for showing the beauty and value of wildlife and wild places—and challenges us to protect them. Take a look at just a few of WWF's favorite photographs from 2018.

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  • WWF and partners share a new tool for studying—and saving—coral reefs

    Coral reefs are as vulnerable as they are beautiful; climate change is warming ocean waters and devastating reefs globally. Monitoring the health and resilience of coral reefs is a lengthy and slow process. That’s why WWF is turning to an innovative tool that speeds up the collection of valuable coral reef data and allows scientists to share new information sooner.

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  • WWF and WCS share a new tool for studying—and saving—coral reefs

    Coral reefs are as vulnerable as they are beautiful; climate change is warming ocean waters and devastating reefs globally. Monitoring the health and resilience of coral reefs is a lengthy and slow process. That’s why WWF is turning to an innovative tool that speeds up the collection of valuable coral reef data and allows scientists to share new information sooner.

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  • Imperiled polar bears face new threat in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    In some areas of the Arctic, female polar bears are more frequently choosing to build their maternity dens on land, rather than sea ice. The land provides the stability and security that sea ice no longer can—at least until human activity comes into the picture.

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  • Dishing the dirt on the secret life of soil

    Soil is a living, breathing ecosystem that’s home to a quarter of all species on Earth. It's richness of life is what supports forests and prairies; biodiversity in the soil also enhances agriculture. Yet agriculture, which needs soil, is the leading cause of its erosion. Indeed, healthy soil is disappearing from the surface of the earth at a rate of about 24 billion tons a year. Here are some examples of the types of living creatures in soil that make it such a vibrant, vital habitat.

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  • Why global leaders must address climate change now

    The United Nations climate talks are the most important round of negotiations since the Paris Agreement was reached three years ago. There is still time for us to prevent the worst impacts of climate change and create a safer future, but that window is closing fast.

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  • Critically endangered Sumatran Rhino moved to new home

    Last month, the Indonesian Government announced that a first Sumatran rhino, a female named Pahu, was successfully rescued from a small isolated forest patch in Kalimantan, with the support of WWF, local partners and Sumatran Rhino Rescue.

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  • Handcrafted beauty from around the globe

    Local communities and indigenous people are crucial stewards of the natural places WWF works to conserve. The handicrafts are a small thank you for your support of World Wildlife Fund and all its programs.

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  • Mega dam project could drive Argentina’s hooded grebes to extinction

    A pair of mega dams in construction on the Santa Cruz River is expected to significantly alter the flow of the Santa Cruz river and harm a variety of local species, including hooded grebes. But due to an incomplete environmental impact assessment of the project, nobody knows just how much damage it could cause. Hooded grebes live only in Santa Cruz Province, where they were discovered in 1974. In the 1980s, their population numbered around 5,000. But since then, their population has declined by more than 80%.

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  • New partners join national governments to fight climate change

    There’s still a significant gap between current country emissions reductions pledges and what’s needed to limit global temperature rise. In response, leaders from businesses, local governments, higher education, and communities are coming together to establish domestic coalitions in support of climate action. 

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  • Sustainable shrimp?

    Titi shrimp, or pomada, are wild shrimp, native to Ecuador, and they are harvested around the Gulf of Guayaquil by both trawlers and artisanal fishermen using a unique kind of trap that doesn’t exist anywhere else in the world. WWF-Ecuador has been working with both the industrial and artisanal fishermen to ensure that the fishery is sustainable.

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